“Eggonomics”: Pakistanis mock PM’s ‘chicken plan’ to ease poverty

50442720e9fe4b3da203780c718515ef_18

 

Summary

 

Imran Khan, Pakistan’s Prime Minister announced on Thursday his intentions to ‘uplift’ the poor by providing chickens and eggs to rural women with the intention to invigorate the poultry industry. His plans, which mirror a similar recommendation by Bill Gates were met with a barrage of insults and criticisms on Twitter. The plan has been mockingly dubbed “eggonomics” by some and has garnered quite a lot of attention. One Twitter user wrote, “Dear Imran Khan please think 100 times before you speak on national and international platforms. Discussing eggs and chickens on a day when you’re presenting 100 days plan is ridiculous,”. The plan, however, was meant to help address the 24.3 percent of Pakistan’s population that lives below the poverty line, and as a result, Khan took to Twitter to defend his proposal. Along with agriculture contributing to 20 percent of Pakistan’s GDP, he said “For the colonised minds when desis (local people) talk about chickens combating poverty they get mocked, but when “walaitis” (foreigners) talk about desi chicken and poverty it’s brilliance!,”, alluding to Bill Gates’ 2016 proposal receiving widespread praise. Though it does not represent the end all be all solution for Pakistan’s troubling economy, for now, it has put the spotlight on Khan’s efforts to revitalize Pakistan for the better.

 

 

 

 

Eggonomics: Pakistanis mock PM’s ‘chicken plan’ to ease poverty

 

Pakistan’s Prime Minister Imran Khan has hit back at criticism over a proposal to alleviate poverty by developing the local poultry industry, citing a similar recommendation by US billionaire Bill Gates.

In a wide-ranging speech on Thursday marking his government’s first 100 days in office in the capital Islamabad, Khan said rural women will be given chickens and eggs to start poultry businesses, which he said is a “great plan” to help eradicate poverty.

“I’m proposing such a plan which doesn’t require billions of dollars,” said the cricketer-turned-politician.

“The project has been experimented with. If we provide them (rural women) with injections, this will raise the [chickens’] protein intake and they (women) will have more chickens and eggs to sell. This is a way to uplift the poor.”

An estimated 24.3 percent of Pakistan’s population lives below the national poverty line, according to the latest World Bank figures.

Khan’s recommendation was received with both applause and amusement in the audience, but social media users and opposition politicians later mocked him, poking fun at the prime minister’s “eggonomics”.

“Dear Imran Khan please think 100 times before you speak on national and international platforms. Discussing eggs and chickens on a day when you’re presenting 100 days plan is ridiculous,” wrote Usman Khan on Twitter.

“After listening to Imran Khan’s speech last evening, I am SHOCKED and concerned for our country. Eggs, Desi chicken, Kattas based economy at a time when fourth industrial revolution is on the horizon is a much too serious comedy. It shows what kind of agenda is being discussed in PM office,” wrote Ahsan Iqbal, former interior minister and member of the opposition PML-N party.

‘Excited about chickens’

Responding to the social media storm, Khan posted a Business Insider article published in 2016, titled “Bill Gates explains why chickens are the ultimate solution to poverty”.

“For the colonised minds when desis (local people) talk about chickens combating poverty they get mocked, but when “walaitis” (foreigners) talk about desi chicken and poverty it’s brilliance!,” Khan posted.

In 2016, Gates, philanthropist and founder of tech giant Microsoft, donated more 100,000 chickens to Heifer International, a charity that focuses on sustainable farming and women empowerment.

“It’s pretty clear to me that just about anyone who’s living in extreme poverty is better off if they have chickens,” Gates wrote in a blog, underlining the benefits of breeding chickens to impoverished families.

“It sounds funny, but I mean it when I say that I am excited about chickens,” he added.

Many jumped to Khan’s defence and also shared Gates’ theory on the subject.

 

Pakistan’s agriculture sector contributes more than 20 percent of the national gross domestic product (GDP) and is an important employer.

Khan’s new government, which came to power in July, is faced with huge economic challenges, marked by a mounting balance payments deficit.

On Friday, the Pakistani currency plunged almost five percent to a record low of 143 rupees against the US dollar.

Talks with the International Monetary Fund over a potential bailout package are currently under way.

 

 

Source: Aljazeera, (No Byline), Dec. 1, 2018. Photo credit to Mohsin Raza/Reuters.